Smithtown Township Arts Council

a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit organization
                                                                                       DIRECTIONS

Vision
The Smithtown Township Arts Council, knowing that the arts are vital to the human spirit, encourages citizens to celebrate, participate in, and support the arts in their everyday lives. The arts, in turn, will grow Smithtown Township’s capacity for creativity, build more vibrant communities and bridge differences among people .

Mission
The Smithtown Township Arts Council promotes the arts to protect and enrich Suffolk County's unique quality of life.

Goals

To fulfill its mission, the Smithtown Township Arts Council will:

Expand opportunities to learn in and through the arts

Strengthen Smithtown Township artists and arts organizations

Engage the arts to benefit people and communities throughout Suffolk County

Values

The Smithtown Township Arts Council develops policies, programs, and procedures around the following beliefs:

Everyone in Suffolk County should have access to the arts regardless of age, income, ethnicity, disability, geographic location or other potential barrier to arts participation.

The arts are basic to a complete education.

The arts can help build vital communities.

Creative enterprises are integral to the cultural community and our local economy.

About the Mills Pond House



The noted New York City architect, Calvin Pollard, designed the Greek Revival Mills Pond house in 1838 for William Wickham Mills. Like his client, Pollard was born in 1797 and was raised in upstate New York, but found success in the big City. Mills descended from a long line of wealthy Long Island farmers who gave the name Mills Pond to an area known to the Indians as Cuttscunsuck ("two small ponds"). Mills Pond House preserves the locality's name, but departs from tradition in other respects. Its high-style Grecian design is unusual on Long Island and the hand of an accomplished architect is nearly unique at this early date. Pollard's influence is seen in the use of imported materials: Albany boards, Carolina yellow pine, English glass, Connecticut stone, and Santo Domingan mahogany. Even the silvered hardware, decorative plaster, and carpeting were bought in New York City shops. William Wickham Mills died in 1865 and his home descended in the family until its gift to the Town of Smithtown in 1976. today, it is preserved for use as an arts-related facility